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Unsafe Goods Notices – current bans

Current unsafe goods bans.

There are Unsafe Goods Notices for:

View unsafe goods notices that have been revoked or expired.

Unsafe Goods (Small High Powered Magnets) Indefinite Prohibition Notice 2014

This notice came into force on 24 July 2014 for an indefinite period.

Small high-powered magnet sets are unsafe and cannot be sold for personal use.

This notice applies to new and second-hand small high-powered magnets that are supplied, or offered or advertised for supply, in sets of 2 or more for personal use. This use includes (but is not limited to) magnet sets that form part of a toy, game or puzzle, construction or modelling kits, or jewellery that is worn around the nose or mouth.

The notice does not apply to hardware magnets, magnets used for teaching, or those that are (or are intended to become) parts of other products.

The thresholds for magnet size and strength (power) are established by referring to specific tests in the Australian / New Zealand Standard, "Safety of toys – Part 1: Safety aspects related to mechanical and physical properties" (AS/NZS ISO 8124.1:2013). 

View Unsafe Goods (Small High-powered Magnets) Indefinite Prohibition Notice 2014 [138KB PDF, 1 page] for detailed wording of the Notice.

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Unsafe Goods (Multipurpose Ladders) Indefinite Prohibition Notice 2014

This notice came into force on 22 May 2014 for an indefinite period.

The notice applies to new multipurpose ladders supplied, or offered for supply, or advertised for supply, in trade.

'Multipurpose ladder' means any portable ladder having one or more pairs of articulation joints, which allow the ladder to be rearranged to function as:

  • a single ladder, with or without a stand-off
  • a single or double sided step ladder
  • scaffold or work platform.

'Articulation joint' means a hinge which is capable of being locked in one or more positions.

All multipurpose ladders must fully comply with all applicable clauses of AS/NZS 1892.1:1996 Portable ladders and the tests set out in Schedule 1. 

View Multipurpose Ladders Unsafe Goods Notice 2014 [844KB PDF]

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Unsafe Goods Notice (Chainsaws without a Chain Brake) Indefinite Prohibition Notice 2012

This notice superseded Unsafe Goods Notices issued 24 September 2009 and 23 December 2010

This notice applies to new and used chainsaws supplied, or offered for supply, or advertised for supply, in trade or otherwise than in trade.

“Chainsaw” means any powered machine which drives an exposed chain for the purposes of cutting and which is operated by being hand held. This excludes any driven chains which are operated at the end of a pole and which are generally referred to as “pole pruners”, “power pruners” or “long reach pruners”.

All chainsaws must have chain brakes which comply with ISO 6535:2008 Portable chainsaws – chain brake performance.

View notice

What does this mean for business?

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Unsafe Goods (Lead in children's toys) Indefinite Prohibition Notice 2009

First banned 20 September 2007 and supply prohibited indefinitely from 26 March 2009.

Children’s toys which contain lead in their accessible parts at a migration level greater than 90 mg/kg of toy material are declared to be unsafe goods and are prohibited from supply indefinitely.

Migration level means the value calculated after testing in accordance with the procedures and result interpretation provisions of the Australian/New Zealand Standard AS/NZS ISO 8124.3:2003 entitled ‘Safety of toys, Part 3: Migration of certain elements’.

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Unsafe Goods (Hot Water Bottles) Notice 2008

Rubber hot water bottles that did not meet the British Standard were first banned 26 November 2004 and supply prohibited indefinitely from 11 December 2008.

Prohibits the supply of:

  • PVC and Rubber hot water bottles that do not:
    • meet BS1970:2001 or BS1970:2006 Hot water bottles manufactured from rubber and PVC specification

Rubber and (from 25 November 2007) PVC hot water bottles must also:

  • show compliance of less than 36 months old with BS1970:2001 or BS:1970:2006 from a laboratory accredited to ISO17025.

Importer's Declaration of Conformity

Importers of hot water bottles (including hot water bottles made from PVC from 25 November 2007) will be required to produce to the New Zealand Customs Service a:

  • Test certificate, from an accredited laboratory to ISO 17025, certifying that the hot water bottles comply with British Standard BS 1970:2001 or BS 1970:2006 Hot water bottles manufactured from rubber and PVC Specification. The certificate must be less than 36 months old; and

Statutory declaration stating that the documents produced relate to the hot water bottles being imported. 

A sample copy is available here [PDF 45kb]

You will have to supply the statutory declaration to the New Zealand Customs Service to declare conformity to the requirement of the Unsafe Goods (Hot Water Bottles) Notice 2008.

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Unsafe Goods (Candles and Candlewicks) Notice 2001 Prohibited indefinitely 

Supply prohibited indefinitely from January 2002.

Prohibits the supply of:

  • Candles containing greater than 0.06% lead by weight in their wicks
  • Candlewicks containing greater than 0.06% lead by weight.

Replaced the Unsafe Goods (Candles and Candlewicks) Notice 2001 which did not allow for tolerances of accidental and possibly unavoidable trace elements of lead and which came in to effect in June 2000.

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Unsafe Goods (Pistol Crossbows) Notice 1988 Prohibited indefinitely

Prohibits the supply of:

  • The Ninja pistol crossbow
  • The Barnett Phantom crossbow
  • Any pistol crossbow, which does not have a safety-catch on the firing mechanism.

 

 

Last updated 1 August 2014
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